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Exhibitions & Events:

Disarming Geometries Banner

NYCDCA credit

Performing Geometries Banner Making Marks Banner Almost Home Banner

NYCDCA credit..........................................................................................................................................

January 15 – March 26, 2017
Disarming Geometries
Featuring the work of hannes bend, Glenn Fischer, Shanti Grumbine, Nicholas Hamilton, Samantha Holmes, Maria Hupfield,Tatiana Istomina, Glendalys Medina, Mitch Paster, Armita Raafat, Martyna Szczesna, Ryan Turley, & Christine Wong Yap

Curated by Gabriel de Guzman
Opening Reception: Sunday, January 15, 2017, 2-5 pm

Click on image to view Brochure PDF

Disarming Geometries Cover

Click to view Press Release

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March 26, 2017, 3:00-4:30pm
Performing Geometries
A Performance by Shanti Grumbine and Short Film Screening by Tatiana Istomina
followed by a Conversation with the Artists and Exhibition Curator, Gabriel de Guzman

Seating will be limited
RSVP 718-937-6317 or rsvp: rsvp@dorsky.org

Istomina image Grumbine image
Tatiana Istomina, Helene's Story (work in progress, film still), 2016-17;
Shanti Grumbine, The Last Color: A Reliquary (performance still), 2016

In Shanti Grumbine’s performative reading, The Last Color: A Reliquary, the artist recites text that imagines a post-apocalyptic collapse of language and the rediscovery of communion through engagement with the plastic sleeves that protect the daily newspaper. Tatiana Istomina will present an excerpt of the work in progress, Helene’s Story, a collaborative multimedia project she is creating with Montreal-based puppet artist Mona Sharma. Following the performances, exhibition curator Gabriel de Guzman will lead a conversation with Grumbine and Istomina. They will discuss how the artists’ performance projects add another dimension to their visual art pieces on view in the gallery and how they relate to ongoing themes in their overall work. The artists will also talk about shared topics of interest, including the use of abstract symbols in language and for communicating beliefs and dogma.

Shanti Grumbine is a Brooklyn-based visual artist who has exhibited nationally and internationally, including at venues such as The Bronx Museum, Center for Contemporary Arts Santa Fe, A.I.R Gallery, Magnan Metz Gallery, Planthouse Gallery, and International Print Center New York. She has participated in artist residencies at the Millay Colony, Saltonstall Foundation, Ucross Foundation, Yaddo, Wave Hill’s Winter Workspace, the Lower East Side Printshop Keyholder Residency, The Bronx Museum’s Artist in the Marketplace (AIM), the Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and LABA Fellowship at the 14th Street Y. Grumbine is currently on a yearlong residency through the RAIR Fellowship program in Roswell, NM. She received an MFA from the University of Pennsylvania and a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Tatiana Istomina is a New York-based artist and art critic whose background in scientific data analysis has informed her creative practice. Her work has been featured in recent exhibitions at The Drawing Center, Planthouse Gallery, The Bronx Museum, Gallery Aferro in Newark, Gallery Augusta in Helsinki, Blue Star Contemporary Art Museum in San Antonio, and Art Palace in Houston, TX. Residencies include Spillways, Yaddo, Open Sessions at The Drawing Center, Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) at The Bronx Museum, Soho20 summer studio, and Core at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX. Her critical writing has been published in Art in America, Arte Fuse, and The Brooklyn Rail. She earned a PhD in physics from Yale University and an MFA from Parsons School of Design.

Gabriel de Guzman is Curator of Visual Arts at Wave Hill in the Bronx. He has also organized exhibitions for Rush Arts Gallery, The Jewish Museum, Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance (NoMAA), Carriage Barn Arts Center, Boriqua College, the Affordable Art Fair, New York, as well as The Bronx Museum’s 2013 AIM Biennial. His writings have been published in catalogues for Wave Hill, The Bronx Museum, Arsenal Gallery at Central Park, Kenise Barnes Fine Art, The Jewish Museum, Rush Arts Gallery, and NoMAA. He earned an MA in art history from Hunter College and a BA in art history from the University of Virginia.

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March 30 – April 16, 2017
Making Marks: Digital Sketches to Painted Stories
Featuring the work of Steve Block and Kenneth E. Parris III

Curated by Chelsea L. Cooksey
Opening Reception & Curator/Artist Tour: Sunday, April 2, 2017, 2-5 pm

Kenneth Parris III Image Steve Block Image
Kenneth E. Parris III, Punching Bag Portrait; Steve Block, CYC

The present show features two artists — Steve Block and Kenneth E. Parris III — who share parallels in subject matter and theme, commonalities in materials, but key to the pairing of these two artists in this exhibition is their painterly process, the incorporation of contemporary technology as a key element in the creation of their paintings. Both Block and Parris have a multistep process or plan, an adherence to using digital technology as a tool in a back and forth modus between image manipulation and the more traditional painterly mark making. Both of these painters’ practices employ diverse techniques such as, sketching on paper, drawing digitally, photographic compilation, image manipulations, conceptual experimentation in scale and perspective, collage and painting in various mediums. Both artists incorporate digitally generated elements and traditional art making techniques in the creation of their paintings.

Block’s current series began with left over raw canvases that were used as a studio drop cloth to catch errant paint droppings and sharpen oil sticks for a different body of work. After a few days, the random bits of colors started to take on a form of their own. Block liked what was building on the floor, under the easel. The detritus took on a life of its own, becoming art, prompting his current series Released. For the first time in his painting practice, Block began using digitally drawn sketches as the origin for his oil stick and acrylic on canvas paintings. Prior to this series, Block used digital sketching solely as effort to find a way to sketch fast, whenever an idea came to him, or when he saw something in the real world that spoke to him. Block is drawn to the versatility and speed of drawing digitally, his sketching and planning period is decisive; it is not tentative or hesitant. An idea forms, and through digital drawing, he capitalizes on the immediate ability to translate an image to the screen. His paintings, though modeled after the sketches, are worked in the opposite fashion. The painterly process is completed at a slower, more methodical pace, through a process layering and painting with enamel, acrylic paint and oil sticks onto unprimed canvas. As Block’s process of basing his paintings on his digital drawing develops, the digital and painted works become nearly indistinguishable.

The narrative paintings in Parris’ series, How we make it and survive while trying, struggling for an extraordinary and peaceful life are created with a multistep “Painting Plan”; a process of drawing, photography, digital manipulation, collage and painting. He starts with a process of writing and sketching images and ideas, which are often inspired by the news, television, printed materials and daily life experiences. Parris then compiles photographic compositions based on these exploratory sketches, and scans them into a Photoshop file, allowing him to generate different compositions from the same source file. The successful elements from the Photoshop compilations are used as reference for a second round of graphite drawing. The graphite drawings are scanned into InDesign and digitally manipulated with various techniques that allow for experimentation in scale and perspective, by layering transparent blocks of color to represent the possible placement of collage materials, adding and subtracting washes of color and rendering with digital pen and brush areas that he may want to execute in more detail. Upon completion, the scaled images are printed onto large format papers, affixed and layered onto the canvas with collage elements from found book pages, patterned wrapping paper from cut flowers, and printed materials. Using more traditional painterly techniques and materials, layers and washes of paint are applied with brushes, squeegees, palate knives and oil sticks and with the artist’s bare hands. Each of these steps contributes key elements to the final painting. Parris’ smooth, carefully constructed surfaces reflect his measured multistep painterly process.

As viewers, we are encouraged to look closer at Block’s and Parris’ paintings and reexamine the artists’ techniques, to explore their painterly processes, which involve digital sketching, drawing, manipulating images and painting with various mediums. One series of work was selected from each artist to explore more in depth their individual and collective uses of these mediums, prompting a closer look at the relationship between digital sketching and painterly mark making.

— Chelsea L. Cooksey, New York, NY 2017

Chelsea L. Cooksey is an art historian whose specialty is modern and contemporary art; she received her M.A. in Modern and Contemporary Art from Purchase College and B.A. in Art History from the University of Colorado Denver. Her previous positions included Research Assistant to the Director of The Arshile Gorky Foundation working on the catalogue raisonne, assistant to the Program Coordinator of the Art Students League of New York and Assistant for Oral History interviews for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. She is currently the Registrar at Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs, where she has curated two exhibitions, The Intimacy of Abstraction and Nearly Uniform: Contemporary Silverpoint Drawings.

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May 7 – July 16, 2017
Almost Home: Between Staying and Leaving a Phantom Land
Featuring the work of Wafaa Bilal, Keren Benbenisty, Juanli Carrión,
Daniel Greenfield-Campoverde, Claudia Joskowicz, Ayesha Kamal Kahn,
Dana Levy, Esperanza Mayobre, Elham Rokni, Karina Skvirsky Aguilera

Curated by Shlomit Dror
Opening Reception: Sunday, May 7, 2017, 2-5 pm

More information coming .soon.

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